Monday, August 14, 2017

Major Clephane's Company's Expenses from Kilravock to Glasgow, 1757

A detailed account of Major Clephane's company's expenses on their march from Kilravock to Glasgow, Scotland encompassing approximately 180 miles over a 10-day period, with layovers for entertainment, supplies, and fresh horses. The soldiers would stay in Glasgow for an additional 10 days or so, presumably waiting on the arrival of the remaining companies from the regiment.

Newspaper accounts depict the recruits' uniforms reviewed in Glasgow during this period, and about April 19th proceeding west to Port Patrick en route to Donaghadee, Ireland. From there, they would eventually march south to Cork, Ireland and depart for North America in 10 transport ships under cover of the Enterprize, a 40-gun man-of-war, on June 30, 1757.

In a letter to his brother, dated April 8, 1757 at Kilraick, Major Clephane discussed the first two companies departing together for Glasgow. "...I have at last sent off for Glasgow 124 recruits along with Colonel Fraser’s company (our two companies making the first division of the battalion)." Captain Arthur Rose, Kilraick's uncle, would accompany Clephane's men on the march due to his pressing business around the country.

Expenses from Kilravock to Glasgow

Marcht from Kilraick Thursday 31 March 1757
Dulcey, 31st
- For Entertenment:  £0  10  0

Avemore, April 1st
- For horse hire:  £0  3  6
- For Entertenment:  £0  5  6
- To McCoulmore for horse hire:  £0  6  0

Ruven, April 2d & 3d
- For Drams to the men:  £0  13  6
- For Entetenment for 2 days:  £0  15  6

Dalnacardigk, April 4th
- For Entetenment:  £0  6  6
- To the Seven Nairn men accounted for:  £0  7  0
- To John Innes 6 mens pay for 2 days accounted for:  £0  6  0
- To John Fraser 8 mens pay for 2 days accounted for:  £0  8  0
- To Donald McIntosh the Cook accounted for:  £0  1  6
- To the seven men sent back to Inverness:  £0  7  0
- To John Robertson accounted for:  £0  ?  0
- To Donald Cuthbert accounted for:  £0  ?  0
- To McCoulmore for hors hire:  £0  5  0
- To John Watson and Gray:  £0  10  6
- To McCoul:  £0  5  0
- To Donald McDonald & Little Donald McDonald one sh each:  £0  2  0

- To John Watson at Crief April 6th for the men:  £3  0  0
- To McCoulmore for horsehire at Crief:  £0  3  6
- For Drams to the men at Rumelru:  £0  10  6
- For Entertenment at Tay Bridge:  £0  6  0
- To McCoul:  £0  3  6

Sterling April 7th
- To John Watson more for the mens pay:  £2  0  0
- For Entertenment:  £0  4  0
- To the piper:  £0  3  6

Kirkintullock April the 8th
- To Entertenment:  £0  3  0
- For Servants and horse:  £0  3  0

Glasgow April the 9th
- To John Watson more money for the mens pay:  £5  5  0

Glasgow April 11th
- To McCoule for carreing him home:  £?  ?  0
- To old McKenzies accounted for:  £0  0  6
- To McCoule for horse hire at Glasgow:  £0  3  6
- Got back from John Watson of the 5 guineas:  £0  18  0
- Given to John Watson for the mens pay:  £5  0  0
- To James Geddes and his comerad Six pence each the same:  £0  1  0

Glasgow April 13th
- To John Watson for the mens:  £5  0  0
- Recived Back for John Watson:  £1  1  0
- To Robertson from Holland:  £0  3  0
- To the Piper:  £0  2  0

Saturday Aprile 16th paid all the men their pay & arrears
from the time they left Kilraick till the above date

April 6 gave John Watson:
£3  2  0
-To Sandie Rose:
£3  3  0
- More to Sandie Rose:
£2  2  0
- More to Sandie Rose Sunday:
£2  2  0
     £01  9  0
Gave more to the mens use:
£5  5  0
18 more to Sandie Rose:
£1  1  0
  £16  15  0

April 18th Glasgow
John Watson & Rose Debers
- To Sandie Rose:
£21  0  0
- from 16th till 18th:
£16  15  0
- from 13th till 16th:
£5  0  0
- from 11th till 13th:
£5  0  0
- from 9th till 11th:
£5  5  0
Stirling April 7th
- from 7th till 9th:
£2  0  0
April 6th at Crief: 
£3  0  0
£21  0  0

Glasgow April 18
John Watson Credetor
Credetor:
£1  1  0
Credetor: 
£0  18  0

The different cantonments en route to Glasgow, 31 March - 9 April, 1757:
- Dulsie, 31 Mar.
- Aviemore, 1 Apr.
- Ruthven Barracks, 2-3 Apr.
- Dalnacardoch, 4 Apr.
- Crief, 6 Apr.
- Stirling, 7 Apr.
- Kirkintulloch, 8 Apr.
- Glasgow, 9 Apr.

Note: Donald McDonald and "Little" Donald McDonald are most likely father/son.

Sources:
Major James Clephane, "Account of the company's expenses on the march to embark at Greenock, 31 March - 18 April, 1757." NAS, GD125-22-16-16.

Rose, H., and Lachlan Shaw. A Genealogical Deduction of the Family of Rose of Kilravock: with Illustrative Documents from the Family Papers, and Notes. Edinburgh, 1848.

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2017.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Letter from Major Clephane, Second Highland Battalion, to the Doctor, 1757

The 78th Regiment of Foot, 1757-1763
Kilraick, April 8, 1757

My dear Johnie,

No doubt that you will be much surprised that, till now, you have had no letter from me ever since I came to this place, which is not 20 days, but I’m persuaded you’ll give great allowance for my silence, when I tell you that till yesterday I have not been 24 hours at one time here; sometimes one day at Inverness, next day return here, and a third day at Nairn, and so on alternately, often reviewing my recruits, and Kilraick and I engaging good men and dismissing worse. In short, this has been my life all this while. Add to all this a crowd of company always in the old Castle, under pretence, forsooth, of seeing me, which, God knows, is only a pretence in many; but no more of that. Now I come to tell you, which I well know will give equal pleasure to you as to me, that I have at last sent off for Glasgow 124 recruits along with Colonel Fraser’s company (our two companies making the first division of the battalion,) and yesterday I sent off six men more to go with the last division from Inverness, which leaves that to-day, so that I hope the whole battalion will be at Glasgow by the 19th or 20th of this month. I have given orders that the nine or ten men I have in Angus and Perthshire shall join my company at Crieff, to go along with them to Glasgow. With this great number of men which I have got (which, by the by, have been levied altogether by my worthy friend Kilraick, and a few others, without the assistance of any one officer or sergeant belonging to Colonel Fraser’s battalion,) I dare assure you that I shall be able, when I come to Glasgow, to make out a company of 110 or 112 men, as good hearty young fellows as are to be seen in many regiments, and all as willingly and cheerfully engaged as is possible any men to be, for not one of them ever confined, and not one deserted while here, in which I glory and have great joy. Upon my arrival at Edinburgh, and finding there, my letters from Kilraick, of his surprising success for me, I was obliged to put a stop to my friends recruiting for me in Angus and Perthshire, otherwise my number of men would have run too great, and the expense too high, which God knows, are to high already for my poor purse, but in that there is no help, I rather chose to have men than money. Capt. Arthur Rose, Kilraick’s uncle, who, you know, is lieutenant in the Dutch service, was so kind and obliging as to take the charge and trouble to conduct my company to Glasgow, and indeed he was a most fit person for it, as being well acquainted with the humours and genius of every one recruit, as having been among them daily and hourly ever since the recruiting began here, and in whom all of them has great confidence; and he was most assiduous in exercising them as far as he could while here. In short, dear Johnie, he has been of infinite service and use to me in all this affair. And I think I may very safely affirm, that he will turn out a very good officer and he would rather almost go to hell than be obliged to return to Holland again, and that he would willingly accept of a lieutenancy among us, I dare assure you of. For God’s sake, try what you can do for him that way. This family are all well, and minds you often with much affection. How soon as I am settled at Glasgow, I shall be more particular about them than I can be here, for I am in a continued hurry with one of t’other calling for me. The bell rings for dinner, and the post goes off at 4 o’clock. God bless and reward you, shall ever be the earnest prayers of,

My dear Brother,
                        Your most affectionate and obliged Brother
                    James Clephane.


The Doctor succeeded in his endeavour, and Arthur Rose’s name is found as lieutenant of one of the three additional companies of Lieutenant-Colonel Simon Fraser’s regiment, with instructions for raising his quota of men, dated July 16th 1757. He writes from Quebec on the 17th July 1760, to his grand-nephew, announcing his being wounded - "I am sorry I can't accompany you with the fiddle any more, my left hand being rendered useless... The many battles, sieges, and skirmishes we have had, fell heavier on us that any other regiment; having thirteen officers killed between Luisburg and Quebec, and a great number of men among whom is poor Sandie Rose of Little-town. But I hope this summer will put an end to any more fighting. I assure you, dear Hugh, my curiosity that way is entirely satisfied... If there is a peace, I hope soon to be with you, and see you kill some muir-fowl on the muirs about Culmoney, or a fox in the mickle park or birken ward. I shall grow melancholy if I continue in this strain, considering the prodigious distance I am from these happy places."

After the Doctor's death, the Major wanted the encouragement and support which had hitherto sustained him. He sold out of the army in 1760; and from thenceforward Kilravock was his common residence. He was fondly attached to his sister and her children. The easy social life of the castle suited him. He kept up a lazy correspondence with a few old brother officers, and devoted some energy to the care and putting out in the world of two grand-nephews, Harry and James Malcolm, the sons of Captain Henry Malcolm, who were bred from children under the kind nursing of good Betty Clephane, and one of who lived to repay to her and her daughter some part of his obligations. Harry Malcolm went a cadet to India in 1768. Mrs. Rose's letter speak of him as successively Secretary to the Commander-in-Chief and Adjutant-General at Madras.

The first two companies of soldiers would depart Kilravock, Inverness, Scotland for Glasgow on March 31, 1757.

Source:
Rose, H., and Lachlan Shaw. A genealogical deduction of the family of Rose of Kilravock: with illustrative documents from the family papers, and notes [Edinburgh, 1848].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2017. 

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Calendar of New York Colonial Land Papers; Soldiers of the 78th Regiment

Be sure to explore Quebec Land Petitions as some of these same names will appear in both areas.  We have currently identified 234 men of the 78th Regiment that remained in North America after 1763.

1763

Sept. 14. Certificate of Major Abercrombie that Roderick Fraser, corporal in Capt. Hugh Cameron’s company of the 78th regiment, served for the space of seven years.

Nov. 29. Certificate of Alexr. McLeod, captain of the 78th regiment, that Donald Fraser is dismissed, and allowed to go about his lawful affairs.

1764

Feb. --. Petition of Allan McArthur, Donald Livingston, Donald Irvin, David McLeah and Kenneth McKenzie, late soldiers of the 78th regiment, praying their quota of the lands to be granted pursuant to his majesty’s proclamation.

Oct. 12. Certificate of Genl. Gage, that Ensign Alexr. Fraser, junr., served during the war.

Oct. 14. Memorial of Ensign Alexr. Fraser, late of His Majesty's 78th regiment, praying a grant of land in the county of Albany, east of Husdon's River, north of land lately laid out for Lieut. James Bain and Wm. Gregor.

Nov 6. Return of survey for Allan Cameron, late serjeant in the 78th Regiment, of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return of survey for Alexr. Fraser, late serjeant in the 78th regiment, of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, east side of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return for survey for Alexr. Fraser and John Fraser, late privates in the 78th regiment, of 100 acres of land in the county of Albany, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return for survey for Wm. Fraser, late serjeant in the 78th regiment, of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return of survey for Donald Livingston, Allan McArthur, and Jno. McDonald, late privates in the 78th regiment, of 150 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return of survey of Jno. Mcintosh, late private in the 78th regiment, of 50 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return of survey for George Stuart and John McDonald, late private soldiers in the 78th regiment, of 100 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

Nov. 6. Return of survey for Alexr. Fraser, late serjeant in the 78th regiment, of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

1765

[No date]. Certificate of Major James Abercrombie that Alexr. McKenzie served as soldier in the 78th regiment, and discharged 14th Sept., 1763.

[No date]. Certificate of Major John Small that Alexr. McKenzie served in the 78th regiment during the war, &c., 2d March, 1766.

[No date.] Petition of Angus McDonald, private of the 78th regiment, Miles Carmichal and John Black of said regiment, and John Sutherland, private of the 77th regiment, for a grant of 200 acres of land on the east side of Kinderhook river.

Jan. 19. Certificate of Major James Abercrombie, that Donald Cuthbert served as soldier in the 78th regiment, 10th Sept. 1763.

May 9. Return of survey of Thomas McPherson, late private in the 78th regiment, of 50 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

May 9. Return of survey for Donald McIntyre, late corporal in the 78th regiment, of 50 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

May 9. Return of survey for Donald McGilvray, John McKinvin, Donald Irvin, Kenneth McKenzie, all privates in the 78th regiment, and John Forbes, George Southerland and Donald McColl, late privates in the 77th, of a tract of 350 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

May 9. Return of survey for Donald Urquhart, John Sutherland, John Simpson and John McIntire, late privates in the 78th regiment, of a tract of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

May 23. Return of survey for Allan Cameron, late corporal in the 78th Regiment, of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, east of Hudson’s river, (Rupert, Vermont).

May 30. Return of survey for Alexr. McKaga, late a private in the 60th regiment, of a tract of 50 acres of land in the county of Albany, south of a tract surveyed for Allan Cameron, late corporal in the 78th regiment, (Rupert, Vermont).

June 15. Petition for Hugh Fraser, late Lieut. in the 78th regiment, for a grant of 2,000 acres of land, on the east side of the Hudson’s river.

July 23. Return of survey for Evan Cameron, late corporal in the 78th regiment, of a tract of 200 acres of land on the east side of the Hudson’s river, in the county of Albany.

Oct. 21. Return of survey for Roderick Fraser, late corporal in the 78th regiment, a tract of 200 acres of land in the county of Albany, on the east side of Hudson’s river.

1766

June 22. Certificate of Lieut. Alexr. Fraser, that James Ross served as serjeant in the 78th regiment, commanded by Capt. Fraser, and in Capt. McDonell’s company.

July 8. Petition of James Ross, late serjeant in the 78th regiment, praying that the 200 acres of land formerly petitioned for by them be located in the county of Albany, east of Lake Champlain, and north of lands petitioned for by Lieut. Wm. Barron.

Dec. 1. Certificate that Alexr. Fraser served as corporal in the 78th regiment during the war.

Oct. 24. Memorial of Lieut. Alexander Fraser, of the late 78th regiment, for a grant of 2,000 acres of land, in the townships of New Fane and Townsend.

1767

Jan. 18. Certificate that Alexander Robertson served as soldier of the 78th regiment.

Feb. 17. Petition of Alexr. Fraser, late corporal in the 78th regiment, for a grant of 200 acres of land to the east of a tract of 1,000 acres granted to Capt. Shirreff on Lake Champlain.

Mar. 23. Petition of Duncan Weir, serjeant in the 78th regiment, Alexr. McDonald, private, and Duncan McArthur, private in said regiment for a grant of lands near Dear Field on the west side of the Connecticut river.

1768

Apr. 27. Petition of Kenneth McCullock, late ensign of the 78th regiment, for 2,000 acres of land on the west side of the North river, in the county of Albany.

1771

Feb. 2. Petition of Simon McTavish, in behalf of his father John McTavish, lieutenant in the 78th regiment, for a grant of 2,000 acres of land to the east of Schohary kill.

Apr. 16. Petition of Alexr. Gray, late corporal in the 78th regiment, for a grant of 200 acres of land adjoining to Major Campbell’s land on Lake Champlain, and near Crown Point.

Sep. 11. Certificate of Lieut. Alexr. Fraser that John McGillivray served as corporal in the 78th regiment during the war, 7th April 1767.

Source:
New York Secretary's Office. Calendar of N.Y. colonial manuscripts, indorsed land papers; in the Office of the Secretary of State of New York, 1643-1803 [New York, 1864].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2017.  All rights reserved.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Connecticut Quarters for the 63rd Regiment or Second Highland Battalion, 1758

The 78th Regiment of Foot, 1757-1763
The Fraser Highlanders spent their first North American winter, that of 1757-58, in Stratford, Connecticut, with the cantonment spread out as far as 30 miles from headquarters. In this undated letter, Lieutenant-Colonel Simon Fraser describes several of the Connecticut Controuts, followed by his Monthly Return from January 1758.

Billets are included in the Number of Officers, also two officers absent at New York. And in the several Controuts the sick in Hospital are included as their Billets are kept for them.

S. Fraser. Lt. Col. Commandt of 63d

Report of the Quarters of His Majesty's 63d or Second Highland Battalion as Canton'd in the Government of Connecticut in New England, January 1758.

Head Quarters At Stratford
  • Grenadiers
  • Colonels Company
  • Officers: 10
  • Men:  220
At Fairfield
  • Major Clephanes Company
  • Capt. Simon Frasers Company
  • Officers:  9
  • Men:  220
  • Miles Distant From Head Quarters:  8
At Norwalk
  • Major Campbells Company
  • Capt. Campbells Company
  • Officers:  7
  • Men:  220
  • Miles Distant From Head Quarters:  20
At Milford
  • Capt. Macphersons Company
  • Capt. Donald McDonalds Company
  • Officers:  8
  • Men:  220
  • Miles Distant From Head Quarters:  4
At Stanford
  • Capt. John MackDonnels Company
  • Capt. Thomas Frasers Company
  • Officers:  8
  • Men:  220
  • Miles Distant From Head Quarters:  30

Total Officers:  42
Total Men:  1100

Sources:
Colonel Simon Fraser, "Report of the Quarters of His Majesty's 63d or Second Highland Battalion as Canton'd in the Government of Connecticut in New England, January 1758."  NAS, GD45-2-41, pp. 1-5.

Colonel Simon Fraser, "Undated Letter from Lt. Col. Simon Fraser Describing Several Connecticut Controuts." NAS, GD45-2-41, p. 6.

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2017.