Monday, January 22, 2018

The Colonel's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Colonel Fraser's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

The Colonel's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

1. Sergeant Donald Grey
2. Sergeant Donald Fraser
3. Sergeant Alexander Fraser
4. Corporal John Grant
5. Corporal Thomas Ried
6. Corporal Thomas Fraser
7. Drummer Thomas Gunn
8. Private William Anderson
9. Private Alexander Cameron
10. Private Alexander Cameron
11. Private Thomas Cameron
12. Private William Cameron
13. Private John Cameron
14. Private Donald Cameron
15. Private William Cameron
16. Private William Cameron
17. Private Donald Cameron
18. Private Donald Cameron
19. Private Donald Cameron
20. Private Donald Cameron
21. Private Donald Cameron
22. Private Donald Cameron
23. Private Alexander Cameron
24. Private John Fraser
25. Private John Fraser
26. Private John Fraser
27. Private John Fraser
28. Private John Fraser
29. Private Alexander Fraser
30. Private Thomas Fraser
31. Private Thomas Fraser
32. Private Thomas Fraser
33. Private Hugh Fraser
34. Private William Forbes
35. Private John Gunn
36. Private Thomas Maitland
37. Private Donald McBain
38. Private John McBain
39. Private William McDonald
40. Private Alexander McDonald
41. Private Alexander McDonell
42. Private Peter McDonell
43. Private Donald McDonell
44. Private Peter McGregor
45. Private Murdoch McKenzie
46. Private Donald McKenzie
47. Private Donald McKenzie
48. Private Colin McKay
49. Private Alexander McKay
50. Private Alexander McKay
51. Private Evan McPhie
52. Private Hugh Ross
53. Private Alexander Ross
54. Private John Ried
55. Private Robert Robinson
56. Private Walter Simpson
57. Private William Stewart
58. Private Donald Thompson
59. Mary Kennedy
60. Ann Simpson

Time of Entry: Aug. 29, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

61. Private D. Cummins

Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

62. Captain-Lieutenant Donald McBain
63. Lieutenant Simon Fraser
64. Ensign Malcolm Fraser

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

65. Surgeon Mate Donald Morrison

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018.

Major James Abercrombie's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Major James Abercrombie's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Major James Abercrombie's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

1. Sergeant John Campbell
2. Sergeant Duncan McPhie
3. Drummer John McDonell
4. Corporal Finley Fraser
5. Corporal Donald McKenzie
6. Corporal Allen Shaw
7. Private John Anderson
8. Private Niel Beaton
9. Private John Clarke
10. Private Donald Cameron
11. Private Donald Fraser
12. Private Donald Fraser
13. Private John Fraser
14. Private John Fraser
15. Private John Fraser
16. Private Alexander Fraser
17. Private Alexander Fraser
18. Private James Fraser
19. Private James Fraser
20. Private Hugh Fraser
21. Private Hugh Fraser
22. Private Duncan Fraser
23. Private William Fraser
24. Private David Fullerton
25. Private Archibald Henderson
26. Private Duncan Kennedy
27. Private John McDonald
28. Private John McDonald
29. Private Donald McDonald
30. Private Donald McDonald
31. Private Alexander McKay
32. Private Donald McPhie
33. Private John McLeod
34. Private Andrew McCulloch
35. Private Colin McCulloch
36. Private Evan McLachlin
37. Private Alexander Mckenzie
38. Private Duncan McKenzie
39. Private Chr. McKenzie
40. Private Gregor McGregor
41. Private John McMillan
42. Private Evan McMillan
43. Private Peter McIntyre
44. Private Alexander McPherson
45. Private Niel McArthur
46. Private William McGillivrae
47. Private James McCulloch
48. Private Thomas Ross
49. Private Donald Ross
50. Private Hugh Shaw
51. Private John Summer
52. Elizabeth McDonald
53. Chr. Fraser
54. Jean McCulloch

Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

55. Major James Abercrombie
56. Lieutenant John Chisholm
57. Ensign Keneth McCulloch
58. Private George McAdam
59. Private Angus McPherson
60. Private Evan McBean
61. Private Archibald Henderon

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

62. Hugh Tulloch

Notes:
39. Christopher Mckenzie

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Major John Campbell's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Major John Campbell's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Major John Campbell's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Lieutenant John McDonell
2. Lieutenant James Henderson
3. Chaplin Robert McPherson
4. Surgeon Lachlin McPherson
5. Sergeant John McAllum
6. Sergeant George Thomson
7. Sergeant William Fraser
8. Corporal John Campbell
9. Corporal Duncan McFarlane
10. Corporal Allan Cameron
11. Drummer Donald McDonald
12. Drummer Donald Black
13. Private Archibald Buchanan
14. Private Donald Campbell
15. Private Duncan Campbell
16. Private Collin Campbell
17. Private Keneth Cameron
18. Private Angus Cameron
19. Private Alexander Cameron
20. Private Evan Cameron
21. Private Donald Cameron
22. Private Donald Cameron
23. Private John Clarke
24. Private John Duffie
25. Private John Ferguson
26. Private Roderick Ferguson
27. Private Malcolm Ferguson
28. Private Andrew Ferguson
29. Private Duncan Ferguson
30. Private William Fraser
31. Private William Grubb
32. Private Duncan Gillis
33. Private John Gray
34. Private Colin Henderson
35. Private Donald Henderson
36. Private Peter Hill
37. Private John Kennedy
38. Private John Kennedy
39. Private James Lamb
40. Private John Livingston
41. Private Donald McDonald
42. Private John McMillan
43. Private Donald McMillan
44. Private John McKimin [?]
45. Private John McArthur
46. Private Alexander McArthur
47. Private Donald McArthur
48. Private Allen McArthur
49. Private Allen McDougall
50. Private Donald McCulcan
51. Private John McKenzie
52. Private Keneth McKenzie
53. Private Lachlin McQuarry
54. Private Donald McIlnay
55. Private Robert Monro
56. Private John Monro
57. Private Donald Innes [?]
58. Private Donald McIntyre
59. Private Duncan McIntyre
60. Private John McNicol
61. Private Malcolm McLeod
62. Private Keneth McLeod
63. Private Duncan McLachlin
64. Private Lachlin Sinclair
65. Private Donald Thompson
66. Private Donald Thompson
67. Margaret Gillis
68. Jennet McKenzie
69. Mary Campbell

Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

70. Private Thomas Campbell

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain John McDonell's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain John McDonell's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain John McDonell's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Lieutenant Archibald McAllester
2. Lieutenant Alexander Fraser
3. Sergeant Daniel Campbell
4. Corporal Donald Fraser
5. Corporal John McMillan
6. Corporal William Porterfield
7. Drummer James Hamilton
8. Drummer Thomas Fraser
9. Private Alexander Baine
10. Private John Cameron
11. Private John Cameron
12. Private Duncan Cameron
13. Private Donald Cameron
14. Private Donald Cameron
15. Private David Campbell
16. Private Andrew Canvan
17. Private Andrew Calder
18. Private John Chisholm
19. Private Alexander Dunbar
20. Private John Fisher
21. Private Donald Forbes
22. Private John Fraser
23. Private John Fraser
24. Private John Fraser
25. Private Hugh Fraser
26. Private William Fraser
27. Private Alexander Ferguson
28. Private John Ferguson
29. Private William Gow
30. Private Lewis Grant
31. Private John Livingston
32. Private William Harley
33. Private Ranald Thomson
34. Private James Lawson
35. Private Alexander McCauley
36. Private Allen McArthur
37. Private John McKay
38. Private Phanis Knowles
39. Private Archibald McDougall
40. Private John McDonell
41. Private James McDonell
42. Private Donald McDonell
43. Private John McDonell
44. Private John McDonell
45. Private John McDonell
46. Private John McDonell
47. Private Even McDonell
48. Private Alexander McDonell
49. Private Alexander McDonell
50. Private Alexander McDonell
51. Private Samuel McDonell
52. Private Angus McIntosh
53. Private John McIntyre
54. Private Alexander McLeod
55. Private Evan McMillan
56. Private Duncan McMillan
57. Private Angus McNiel
58. Private Roderick McNiel
59. Private John McPherson
60. Private Even McGillvray
61. Private Alexander Monro
62. Private Robert Morris
63. Private William Mills
64. Private Donald Ross
65. Private Alexander Tolmie
66. Private Peter McGregor
67. Betty McMillan

Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

68. Private James Thomson
69. Private Angus McDonell
70. Private Donald Cameron
71. Private Angus Cameron
72. Private Peter McKay
73. Private Niel McPhie
74. Private Peter Stuart

Note: An additional Victual report for this Company, dated July 19, 1763, a month earlier, was also received by the writer from the Public Records Office and checked against this one. This earlier report, judging from the difference in handwriting, was transcribed from the Company clerk's records by a different person. This accounts in part, no doubt, from each individual's interpretation of the Company clerk's scrawl which may have been fairly illegible at times. Note also that there were a few personnel changes, perhaps transfers or discharges, which took place during the month.

1. McAllester spelled McAlester
30a Add Ronald Johnston
35. McCauley spelled McAuley
36. Allen spelled Allan
38. Phanis spelled Phelix
46a Add John McDonell
47. Even spelled Evan
47a Add Alexander Dunbar
57. McNiel spelled McNeal
58. Roderick McNiel is Rodrick McNeal
61. Monro is Munro
63. Mills is Milles
67. Betty McMillan is Mrs. McMillan
68. James Thompson is shown as Sergt with other NCO's

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Hugh Cameron's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Hugh Cameron's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Hugh Cameron's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Captain Hugh Cameron
2. Lieutenant Malcolm Fraser
3. Lieutenant Robert Menzies
4. Ensign James McQueen
5. Sergeant Allan Cameron
6. Sergeant George McKenzie
7. Sergeant Gilbert Anderson
8. Corporal Roderick Fraser
9. Corporal Evan Cameron
10. Drummer Duncan McKenzie
11. Private John Beaton
12. Private Evan Cameron
13. Private Evan Cameron
14. Private Evan Cameron
15. Private John Cameron
16. Private John Cameron
17. Private John Cameron
18. Private Donald Cameron
19. Private Donald Cameron
20. Private William Cameron
21. Private John Campbell
22. Private William Chisholm
23. Private Alexander Fraser
24. Private James Fraser
25. Private Jeremiah Fraser
26. Private John Fraser
27. Private Alexander Fletcher
28. Private John Gibbon
29. Private John Hutchinson
30. Private James Hunter
31. Private John Lowe
32. Private John McGillivrae
33. Private John McDonald
34. Private John McDonald
35. Private Alexander McDonald
36. Private Duncan McCraw
37. Private Duncan McDonald
38. Private Robert McDonald
39. Private Alexander McDougal
40. Private John McIntyre
41. Private Lachlin McIntyre
42. Private Alexander McKenzie
43. Private David McLea
44. Private John McPhie
45. Private Evan McMillan
46. Private Evan McMillan
47. Private Duncan McMillan
48. Private Robert McKinn
49. Private John McFarlane
50. Private Alexander Murray
51. Private Willam Nichols
52. Private John Ross
53. Private James Rhind
54. Private Alexander Ramsey
55. Private George Stuart
56. Private George Sutherland
57. Private George Thomson
58. Private Donald Williamson
59. Elizabeth Hunter
60. Mary McDonald

Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

61. Private Donald McIntyre
62. Private Duncan McRaw
63. Private James Taylor

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

64. John Lamb
65. Donald Gunn
66. William Cameron
67. Dougal Campbell

Note: An additional Victual report for this Company, dated July 19, 1763, a month earlier, was also received by the writer from the Public Records Office and checked against this one. This earlier report, judging from the difference in handwriting, was transcribed from the Company clerk's records by a different person. This accounts in part, no doubt, from each individual's interpretation of the Company clerk's scrawl which may have been fairly illegible at times. Note also that there were a few personnel changes, perhaps transfers or discharges, which took place during the month.

6. McKenzie spelled McKinzie, listed as Corporal
10. McKenzie spelled McKinzie
19a Add Duncan Cameron
22a Add John Chisholm
29. Hutchinson spelled Hutcheson
31. Lowe spelled Law
32. McGillivrae spelled McGilavrie
41. Lachlin spelled Lauchlan
42. McKenzie spelled McKinzie
43. McLea spelled McLay
48. McKinn spelled McKimie
49. McFarlane spelled  McFarline
51. Nichols spelled Nicoll
55. Stuart spelled Stewart
57. Thomson spelled Thompson
59. Shown as Marjory Hunter [?]
60. Shown as Henreta McDonald [?]

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Archibald Campbell's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Archibald Campbell's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Archibald Campbell's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

1. Sergeant John Watson
2. Sergeant James Robertson
3. Sergeant Daniel McAlpin
4. Corporal James Gow
5. Corporal John Campbell
6. Corporal Hector Ross
7. Drummer Simon Fraser
8. Drummer Donald McGillivray
9. Private John Buchanan
10. Private Roderick Baine
11. Private John Browne
12. Private Donald Black
13. Private William Campbell
14. Private Angus Campbell
15. Private William Campbell
16. Private Duncan Campbell
17. Private Donald Campbell
18. Private Donald Campbell
19. Private Evan Cameron
20. Private John Cameron
21. Private John Chisholm
22. Private John Fraser
23. Private John Fraser
24. Private Alexander Fraser
25. Private James Fraser
26. Private Simon Fraser
27. Private Angus Fletcher
28. Private John Gordon
29Private David Gallahan
30. Private Alexander Johnston
31. Private James Knight
32. Private John McCallum
33. Private John McKenzie
34. Private Roderick McKenzie
35. Private Duncan McCraw
36. Private John McPherson
37. Private John McPherson
38. Private Alexander McPherson
39. Private Donald McPherson
40. Private Donald Gibbon
41. Private Alexander McDonell
42. Private Donald McDonell
43. Private Evan McDonell
44. Private Donald McLeod
45. Private John McIntosh
46. Private John McIntosh
47. Private Peter McGregor
48. Private Duncan McNicol
49. Private Donald Cuthbert
50. Private Lachlin McIntosh
51. Private Alexander McArthur
52. Private John McDougal
53. Private William Rose
54. Private Arthur Rose
55. Private William Ross
56. Private John Robertson
57. Private Alexander Smith
58. Catharine McNicol
59. Catharine Noble
60. Catharine Ross
61. Private James Black

Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

62. Captain Archibald Campbell
63. Lieutenant Arthur Rose
64. Ensign Alexander Campbell
65. Private Lachlin McPherson
66. Private James Campbell
67. Private Duncan McNicoll
68. Private Duncan McDougal
69. Private John McBain
70. Private John McCarter
71. Private Finlay Monro
72. Private Hugh Monro
73. Private George Noble

Time of Entry: Sep. 5, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

74. Private James Smith
75. Private James Wright
76. Private John McLeod

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain John Fraser's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain John Fraser's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain John Fraser's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Captain John Fraser
2. Lieutenant Alexander Cameron
3. Lieutenant Alexander Fraser
4. Corporal James McDonald

Time of Entry: Aug. 29, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

5. Corporal Alexander Kennedy

Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

6. Corporal James Sutherland
7. Drummer Thomas Fraser
8. Private Benjamin Allen
9. Private Alexander Cameron
10. Private Alexander Cameron
11. Private William Cameron
12. Private Murdoch Cameron
13. Private Hector Cameron
14. Private John Chisholm
15. Private John Chisholm
16. Private William Chisholm
17. Private William Chisholm
18. Private Keneth Chisholm
19. Private John Fraser
20. Private John Fraser
21. Private John Fraser
22. Private John Fraser
23. Private John Fraser
24. Private William Fraser
25. Private William Fraser
26. Private Alexander Fraser
27. Private Donald Fraser
28. Private Simon Fraser
29. Private Hugh Fraser
30. Private John Forbes
31. Private James Forsythe
32. Private John Innes
33. Private James Lawson
34. Private Hugh McTormet
35. Private Alexander McBain
36. Private Alexander McTavish
37. Private Duncan McTavish
38. Private Hugh McTavish
39. Private Tavish McTavish
40. Private Niel McDonald
41. Private John McDonell
42. Private Donald McDonell
43. Private Hugh McDonell
44. Private Dougal McDonell
45. Private James McIntosh
46. Private John McIntosh
47. Private Donald McGregor
48. Private Donald McGruer
49. Private Farquhar McGillivrae
50. Private John McKay
51. Private Donald McKay
52. Private Duncan McCraw
53. Private John McKenzie
54. Private John McKenzie
55. Private Donald McLean
56. Private John McLean
57. Private John McPherson
58. Private William McNabb
59. Private James [Reoch or Resch?]
60. Private Donald Monro
61. Private William Stewert
62. Private John Waters
63. Private Murdoch McLean
64. Catharine Noble
65. Private William Noble

Note: An additional Victual report for this Company, dated July 19, 1763, a month earlier, was also received by the writer from the Public Records Office and checked against this one. This earlier report, judging from the difference in handwriting, was transcribed from the Company clerk's records by a different person. This accounts in part, no doubt, from each individual's interpretation of the Company clerk's scrawl which may have been fairly illegible at times. Note also that there were a few personnel changes, perhaps transfers or discharges, which took place during the month.

2a Add Evan Cameron, Lieutenant
4. McDonald spelled McDonell, shown as Corporal
5. Kennedy ranked as Drummer
7. Fraser ranked as Corporal
8. Allen spelled Allan, shown as Corporal
30. Forbes spelled Forbis
31. Forsythe spelled Forsyth
34. McTormet spelled McTormitt
35. McBain spelled McBaine
40. McDonald spelled McDonell
49. McGillivrae spelled McGilavrie
52. McCraw shown as McGrah
53. McKenzie shown as McKinzie
54. McKenzie shown as McKinzie
56a Add Murdoch McLean
59. Reoch, possibly Reach
60. Monro spelled Munro
61. Stewert spelled Stewart
64. Catharine spelled Katharine

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Captain Alexander Campbell's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Alexander Campbell's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Alexander Campbell's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Captain Alexander Campbell
2. Ensign John McPherson
3. Sergeant Edward McPherson
4. Sergeant John Fraser
5. Sergeant Duncan Wier
6. Corporal Niel McPherson
7. Corporal Evan McPherson
8. Corporal John McCarly
9. Drummer John Watson
10. Private Andrew Anderson
11. Private John Beaton
12. Private John Cameron
13. Private John Cameron
14. Private Angus Cameron
15. Private Murdoch Cameron
16. Private Duncan Cameron
17. Private Donald Fraser
18. Private James Fraser
19. Private Angus Fraser
20. Private Robert Fraser
21. Private David Gunn
22. Private Donald Livingston
23. Private Alexander Morton
24. Private Peter McNaughton
25. Private Duncan McArthur
26. Private Alexander McDonald
27. Private Lachlin McDonald
28. Private Angus McDonald
29. Private Angus McDonald
30. Private Donald McDonald
31. Private John McGregor
32. Private Malcolm McGregor
33. Private John McGillivrae
34. Private Malcolm McIntyre
35. Private John McIntosh
36. Private James McIver
37. Private John McKay
38. Private Robert McKay
39. Private Donald McKinvin
40. Private Evan McLean
41. Private Malcolm McLeod
42. Private Donald McLeod
43. Private Angus McLeod
44. Private Evan McLeod
45. Private John McLeod
46. Private James McPherson
47. Private James McPherson
48. Private Niel McPherson
49. Private John McPherson
50. Private Donald McPherson
51. Private Donald McPherson
52. Private Thomas McPherson
53. Private William Ross
54. Private Thomas Ross
55. Private Alexander Robertson
56. Private Donald Robertson
57. Private Alexander Robertson
58. Private John Smith
59. Private Robert Shaw
60. Private Lewis Stewart
61. Private Alexander Sutherland
62. Private Robert Wilson
63. Mary McPherson
64. Nearow McDonald [female?]

Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

65. Private Donald Fraser
66. Private Angus Stuart
67. Private James Catanash
68. Private Donald McDonald

Time of Entry: Sep. 5, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

69. Private John Shaw

Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

70. Private Duncan Robertson

Note: An additional Victual report for this Company, dated July 19, 1763, a month earlier, was also received by the writer from the Public Records Office and checked against this one. This earlier report, judging from the difference in handwriting, was transcribed from the Company clerk's records by a different person. This accounts in part, no doubt, from each individual's interpretation of the Company clerk's scrawl which may have been fairly illegible at times. Note also that there were a few personnel changes, perhaps transfers or discharges, which took place during the month.

5. Wier spelled Weir
8. McCarly spelled McErbie
9. John Watson shown as Private
26. McDonald spelled McDonell
27. Lachlin does not appear
28. McDonald spelled McDonell
29. McDonald spelled McDonell
30. McDonald spelled McDonell
33. McGillivrae spelled McGilavrie
34a Add Donald McIntyre
39. McKinvin spelled McKinven
52a Add Lauchlin McPherson
57a Add Duncan Robertson
64. Nearow spelled Nirow

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain John Nairn's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain John Nairn's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain John Nairn's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

1. Sergeant John McKay
2. Sergeant Allan McDonell
3. Sergeant Alexander McDonell
4. Corporal Donald McKenon
5. Corporal William Ross
6. Corporal William Bruce
7. Drummer Donald Burke
8. Private William Anderson
9. Private Duncan Campbell
10. Private Peter Dunbar
11. Private James Forbes
12. Private John Fraser
13. Private Thomas Fraser
14. Private Collin Grant
15. Private Hugh Grant
16. Private Hugh Graham
17. Private William Ganson
18. Private James Henderson
19. Private James Hackney
20. Private Donald Kennedy
21. Private William Moore
22. Private Alexander Monro
23. Private William Monro
24. Private John McColl
25. Private John Mustard
26. Private Roderick Morrison
27. Private Alexander McLeod
28. Private John McLeod
29. Private James McIntosh
30. Private James McIntosh
31. Private Donald McIntosh
32. Private John McGilleray
33. Private Robert McFarlane
34. Private James McKenzie
35. Private Alexander McNabb
36. Private Angus McDonell
37. Private Collin McDonell
38. Private Donald McDonell
39. Private Angus McDonell
40. Private Archibald McDonell
41. Private Angus McDonell
42. Private James McDonell
43. Private John McDonell
44. Private Charles McDonell
45. Private John McDonell
46. Private Malcolm Nicholson
47. Private John Ross
48. Private Alexander Ross
49. Private Alexander Ross
50. Private William Ross
51. Private Archibald Robinson
52. Private George Strachan
53. Private George Sutherland
54. Private Archibald Stuart
55. Private Donald Walker
56. Elizabeth McIntosh
57. Mary McIntosh
58. Jane Monro

Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

59. Lieutenant Allen Stuart
60. Lieutenant Henry Monro
61. Ensign Charles Burnett

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

62. Private John Turnbull
63. Private John Fraser
64. Private William Grant
65. Private John Monro
66. Private Alexander McKay

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Hugh Fraser's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Hugh Fraser's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Hugh Fraser's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

1. Sergeant Alexander McKay
2. Sergeant John Clarke
3. Sergeant Alexander Fraser
4. Corporal Alexander McDonell
5. Corporal George Geddes
6. Corporal Alexander Fraser
7. Drummer John Stuart
8. Private Alexander Campbell
9. Private Peter Campbell
10. Private John Cameron
11. Private Peter [Crell or Croll?]
12. Private George Davidson
13. Private John Fraser
14. Private John Fraser
15. Private John Fraser
16. Private Alexander Fraser
17. Private Donald Fraser
18. Private Alexander Ferguson
19. Private David Jackson
20. Private John Kennedy
21. Private Angus Kennedy
22. Private Donald Levache
23. Private George Miller
24. Private John Mitchell
25. Private John McCutcheon
26. Private Alexander McCraw
27. Private Alexander McTavish
28. Private Robert McDonell
29. Private Alexander McDonell
30. Private John McDonell
31. Private John McDonell
32. Private Allan Eachhorn
33. Private John McLachlin
34. Private Duncan McIntosh
35. Private Farquhar McIntosh
36. Private Alexander McIntyre
37. Private Angus McIntyre
38. Private John McKenzie
39. Private John McKay
40. Private Evan McKay
41. Private Donald McMaster
42. Private Donald McMillan
43. Private Alexander McPhie
44. Private Murdoch McPherson
45. Private Archibald McQueen
46. Private Alexander Patterson
47. Private Alexander Rose
48. Private William Nichey
49. Private Duncan Stuart
50. Private John Stuart
51. Private Peter Stuart
52. Private John Sutherland
53. Private Alexander Sutherland
54. Private John Turner
55. Catharine McDonald

Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

56. Captain Hugh Fraser
57. Lieutenant James Murray
58. Lieutenant George Fraser

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Hugh Montgomerie's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Hugh Montgomerie's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Hugh Montgomerie's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 16, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 28

1. Lieutenant John Fraser
2. Ensign Alexander Fraser
3. Sergeant Angus McPherson
4. Sergeant Alexander Fraser
5. Sergeant Hector Monro
6. Corporal Donald Fraser
7. Corporal John Ferguson
8. Drummer John Provan
9. Private David Buchanan
10. Private Alexander Provan
11. Private Alexander Cameron
12. Private Donald Cameron
13. Private Alexander Cormack
14. Private John Chisholm
15. Private Thomas Davison
16. Private Alexander Fraser
17. Private Hugh Fraser
18. Private John Fraser
19. Private William Fraser
20. Private Martin Ferguson
21. Private James Glass
22. Private James Johnston
23. Private Lachlin Irving
24. Private Roderick McKenzie
25. Private David Mitchell
26. Private Alexander Martin
27. Private Alexander Monro
28. Private Donald Monro
29. Private Roderick Morrison
30. Private Alexander McLeod
31. Private Roderick McLeod
32. Private Roderick McLeod
33. Private Roderick McDonell
34. Private John McDonell
35. Private Hugh McCraw
36. Private William McGillivrae
37. Private George McKay
38. Private John McKay
39. Private Hector McNiel
40. Private John McCLaran
41. Private Donald McLean
42. Private Donald McPherson
43. Private Dougal McPherson
44. Private Malcolm McPhie
45. Private James McQueen
46. Private John McSwaine
47. Private Andrew Rose
48. Private Donald Ross
49. Private John Ross
50. Private John Ross
51. Private John Ross
52. Private John Robertson
53. Private John Smith
54. Private John Strachan
55. Private David Saunders
56. Private Nicholas Wass
57. Private William Williamson
58. Private William Watson
59. Isable Buchanan
60. Agnes Wass

Time of Entry: Aug. 23, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 21

61. Private Alexander Shaw
62. Private William Brown
63. Private William Morrison

Note: An additional Victual report for this Company, dated July 19, 1763, a month earlier, was also received by the writer from the Public Records Office and checked against this one. This earlier report, judging from the difference in handwriting, was transcribed from the Company clerk's records by a different person. This accounts in part, no doubt, from each individual's interpretation of the Company clerk's scrawl which may have been fairly illegible at times. Note also that there were a few personnel changes, perhaps transfers or discharges, which took place during the month.

5. Hector Monro spelled Munro, shown as Corporal
11a Add Alexander Cameron
13. Cormack spelled Cormake
15. Davison spelled Davidson
20. Martin spelled Martine
24. Roderick McKenzie spelled Rodrick McKinzie
26. Martin spelled Martine
27. Monro spelled Munro
28. Monro spelled Munro
29a Add Murdoch Morrison
35. McCraw spelled McGrah
36. McGillivrae spelled McGilavrie
40. McCLaran spelled McLerran
46a Add John McFarlane
54. Strachan spelled Strauchen
56. Wass spelled Vass
59. Isable spelled Isobell
60. Wass spelled Vass

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Alexander McLeod's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Alexander McLeod's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Alexander McLeod's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

1. Captain Alexander McLeod
2. Lieutenant Alexander Fraser
3. Lieutenant Donald Cameron
4. Ensign Kenneth Stuart
5. Sergeant Alexander McNaughton
6. Sergeant James Gordon
7. Sergeant James Sinclair
8. Corporal James Carmichael
9. Corporal Malcolm McNaughton
10. Corporal Duncan McArthur
11. Drummer Ranald Monro
12. Private Rory McDonald
13. Private Niel Brown
14. Private Finlay Campbell
15. Private Duncan Campbell
16. Private Malcolm Cameron
17. Private John Davidson
18. Private Donald Fraser
19. Private James Fraser
20. Private John Fletcher
21. Private John Guillis
22. Private Angus McDonald
23. Private Angus McDonald
24. Private Alexander McDonald
25. Private Allen McDonald
26. Private Allen McDonald
27. Private Allen McDonald
28. Private Allen McDonald
29. Private John McDonald
30. Private John McDonald
31. Private John McDonald
32. Private Donald McDonald
33. Private Donald McDonald
34. Private Evan McDonald
35. Private William McDonald
36. Private Archibald McDonald
37. Private John Eachhorn
38. Private John Eachhorn
39. Private Angus Eachhorn
40. Private Donald McGillivrae
41. Private Donald McIntyre
42. Private John McIntyre
43. Private John McIver
44. Private Finley McKenzie
45. Private Donald Kay [McKay?]
46. Private Evan McKinon
47. Private Dougal McLachlan
48. Private Andrew McLeod
49. Private Alexander McLeod
50. Private Alexander McLeod
51. Private John McLean
52. Private Rory McLellan
53. Private John McMillan
54. Private Donald McMillan
55. Private Donald McNiel
56. Private Donald McNiel
57. Private Charles McPherson
58. Private Malcolm McPherson
59. Private John McPhie
60. Private John McTavish
61. Private William McKirdy
62. Private Robert Ross
63. Private John Robertson
64. Private John Stuart
65. Private Donald Smith
66. Mary Sinclair
67. Catharine Kerdy
68Private John Stuart

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

69. Private Nicholas McLean

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

70. Jennet McKay

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018. 

Captain Ranald McDonell's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Ranald McDonell's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Ranald McDonell's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

1. Captain Ranald McDonell
2. Lieutenant Charles Stuart
3. Ensign Norman McLeod
4. Sergeant Donald Stuart
5. Sergeant William Fraser
6. Sergeant John Ross
7. Corporal Donald McPherson
8. Corporal Alexander McDonald
9. Corporal Gregor McGregor
10. Private Angus Burke
11. Private Donald Burke
12. Private Evan Black
13. Private John Carmichael
14. Private Miles Carmichael
15. Private Donald Clarke
16. Private Edward Davison
17. Private John Dunbar
18. Private John Ferguson
19. Private Alexander Fraser
20. Private Alexander Fraser
21. Private Hugh Fraser
22. Private John Grassett
23. Private Alexander Grant
24. Private Peter Grubb
25. Private John Gunn
26. Private Donald Irving
27. Private Duncan Kennedy
28. Private Robert Keith
29. Private John Kerr
30. Private John Livingston
31. Private Donald McBean
32. Private Donald McColl
33. Private Evan McColl
34. Private Angus McDonell
35. Private Alexander McDonnell
36. Private Archibald McDonell
37. Private Archibald McDonell
38. Private Angus McDonell
39. Private Angus McDonell
40. Private Donald McDonell
41. Private William Monro
42. Private Lachlin Mitchell
43. Private Duncan McGregor
44. Private John McGregor
45. Private Donald McIntosh
46. Private Donald McKinvin
47. Private Duncan McKinvin
48. Private Duncan McKenzie
49. Private Alexander McKenzie
50. Private Alexander McKay
51. Private William McLeod
52. Private John McNabb
53. Private Angus McNabb
54. Private John McNair
55. Private Donald McCrae
56. Private James Ross
57. Private John Ross
58. Private Alexander Stuart
59. Private Norman Stuart
60. Private Donald Sutherland
61. Private Donald Sutherland
62. Private Alexander Sutherland
63. Private Duncan Smith
64. Private James Tavish
65. Private James McLeod
66. Ann Stuart
67. Margaret McGregor

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

68. Private John Fraser
69. Private Duncan McGregor

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018.

Captain Alexander Wood's Company

The following is a list of the officers and men of the 78th Regiment [Fraser's Highlanders] attached to Captain Alexander Wood's Company when the regiment was discharged in 1763. Of the approximately 865 enlisted men and NCOs of the regiment, only 170 men are documented as discharged in America. The other soldiers that stayed were transferred to different regiments in the area.

It should be noted that in these subsistence rolls there are female names appearing in italicised script type. And the more interesting question of what part they played in the regiment can be found in the following notes:

1. In "Louisbourg, Key to a Continent" by Fairfax Downey, p. 160: "--- yet more draft had to be manpower, no animals being available, and it proved to be womanpower as well. Among the parties who tugged on the drag ropes, one thousand strong with frequent shift changes, were several hundred laundresses, a number being allowed to each British regiment by regulation, and carried as 'married and on the strength'. Heavy fire from [the guns of] Louisbourg disconcerted them no more than it did the men."

2. In "The Great Fortress" by William Wood, p. 112: "The practice of assigning laundresses, usually the wives of NCOs to military units was frequently followed. In the U.S. Army, where four were allowed each company, it persisted through the Indian Wars."

3. In "The Fraser Highlanders" by J.R. Harper, p. 73, appears: Included in Wolfe's final orders for embarkation to Quebec from Louisbourg, May 17, 1759: "The regiments are to receive provisions for no more than three women per company of 70, and four per company of 100 men."

These rolls should prove to be of great historic value to those who claim ancestry to soldiers who fought at Louisbourg and Quebec with the 78th Regiment. Many of the soldiers who chose to enlist in Fraser’s Highlanders, did so for the money, and those who stayed when the regiment was discharged in 1763, likely felt that their chances of land ownership were better in the New World than they would have been had they returned to Scotland.

Captain Alexander Wood's Company
Time of Entry: Aug. 30, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 14

1. Corporal John Fraser
2. Private John McDonell
3. Private Donald Cameron
4. Private Alexander McKenzie
5. Private Donald McDonald
6. Private John Kennedy
7. Private James McKenzie
8. Private Angus Gillis
9. Private William Graham
10. Private John McDougal
11. Private John McDonell
12. Private Ranald McDonell
13. Jennet McDonell

Time of Entry: Sep. 6, 1763
Number of Days Victualled: 7

14. Private Roderick McDonell
15. Private John McDonell
16. Private James Crawford
17. Private Lachlin McKenon
18. Private Angus Morrison

Sources:
Treasury Board Papers, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." LAC, T.1, vol. 422.

Ibid, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." TNA, T.1, vol. 422.

Marie Fraser, "Subsistence Rolls of Fraser's Highlanders (the 78th), 1763." Clan Fraser Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2001.

McIntosh, Walter H. 78th or Colonel Simon Fraser's Regiment [Topsfield, Massachusetts, n.d.].

©  Jeffrey Campbell, Fraser's 78th Regiment of Foot, 2018.